FOUR THIRDS PI R3

FOUR THIRDS PI R3

I infinitely thank Lucia Amendola Ranesi, together with Mari’s Manual, for the opportunity to discover the book Quattro Terzi Pi Greco Erre Tre which I loved very much.

What is the volume of the sphere? Four Thirds Pi r3.

It is not the first time that I have told my interest in books on mathematics, but in this case I was immediately struck by the affinity of thought.

Starting with a formula to tell a story

Or starting from a story to tell a formula.

Actually both.

The “formula” to which one arrives, however, is not a calculation, but a journey that leads, or rather: brings back, to the origin.

I don’t like to reveal too much, because I would like you to try the same engaging reading experience that I had, and I would like you too to come to the “full circle” with all the load of emotions that accompanied me.

I considered Quattro Terzi Pi Greco Erre Tre as the equation of a world in which to enter through a wonderful exchange of letters, precisely those handwritten letters, the letters  so dear to me.

A family sphere, but also a historical sphere.

And through the life of the characters I first understood the vocation: the passion for studying and teaching, together, as in a real union that lasts for a lifetime.

But the book also teaches that fate is not always behind the things that scare us the most.

And it shows how pure and true love cannot in any way be dirtied.

I will certainly not forget a special Grandmother, whom I wish I could hug as she repeats that all soldiers are sons.

And a special woman: Maria Moreno, who I hope will be remembered for her ability to combine literary and scientific studies, delicacy and strength of mind, poetry and everyday life.

Obviously I tend to focus more on the female characters, but undoubtedly Rodolfo too, as well as two important figures who have left a mark on our history, offer very interesting reflections.

What if I told you Renato Caccioppoli? What if I told you Ettore Majorana?

In a book so close to my heart, could coffee be missing?!

Obviously not! In fact, here it is:

SCHOOL DIARY

SCHOOL DIARY

I owe the reading of Daniel Pennac’s School Diary to Luciana: THANK YOU Lucy, I’m really grateful to you!

A diary edited by Feltrinelli, which I absolutely loved and which, in my opinion, should also be read at school.

Daniel Pennac, or Pennacchioni, is a teacher in Paris since 1970, better to use his exact words:
We learn that for a quarter of a century the author has practiced as a teacher and that he has chosen this apartment overlooking the courtyards of two schools a bit like a railway worker retiring above a marshalling yard.

In fact, I’ll tell you more: listen to whoever reads these words

 

I open a dutiful parenthesis on Sport’s Bar even if surely you also know Luisona and all the other characters, right?

But let’s go back to reading and to the emblematic phrase of Daniel Pennac’s mother: “Do you think he will get away with it sooner or later?”

Were you doing well in school? Were you among the deserving students and with the high average?

He definitely not, yet he first became a teacher and then a writer!

Daniel Pennac tells us that what he wrote is the “pure truth” and for this reason I found his message even more important.

What better example to give confidence to all those who are faced with uphill paths, who are out of the ordinary “patterns,” who are experiencing momentary failures?

I was thrilled with both the hope this book instills and the way it portrays true teaching.

I find that another sentence of his that deserves a standing ovation is this:
I always thought that school was first and foremost done by teachers. After all, who saved me from school if not three or four teachers?

And also:
Instead of collecting and publishing the pearls of the dunce students that arouse hilarity in so many classrooms, we should write an anthology of good teachers. Literature does not lack similar testimonies: Voltaire who pays homage to the Jesuits Tournemine and Porée, Rimbaud who submits his poems to Professor Izimbard, Camus who writes filial letters to Mr Martin, his beloved teacher, Julien Green who fondly remembers the image vivid of Professor Lesellier, his history teacher, Simone Weil praising his teacher Alain, who will never forget Jules Lagneau who introduced him to philosophy, J.B. Pontalis celebrating Sartre, who “stood out” so much among the other professors …
If, in addition to these famous teachers, the anthology offered the portrait of the unforgettable teacher that almost all of us met at some point in our scholastic path, perhaps we would draw some light on the skills necessary for the practice of this strange profession.

About professors and school diary just recently with Eleonora in the comments you can find here we remembered the glorious years of high school by telling about the decorations of the diaries.

Do you still keep any of yours?

The talk with Eleonora then continued also on the teachers, in particular on those we remember with greater esteem.

And what do you remember of your teachers?

Were any of them particularly enlightening or extremely ironic?

Daniel Pennac’s irony comes to life above all through the stylized men he draws that I obviously like very much.

Apparently I’m not the only one, so much so that I discovered an unofficial site dedicated to Daniel Pennac, and look at what image the author has chosen! 

Coincidence?! I do not think so …

A MONUMENT TO REMEMBER

A MONUMENT TO REMEMBER

A monument to remember, or a monument that must be kept in mind every day is the final sentence of what I could never simply define “comment” that Nick from Matavitatau generously wrote about the Weimar Republic

In case you haven’t read it, I strongly advise you not to lose it: you can find it here

Among other things, he also restored confidence to Massimo since I had wandered a lot from his idea laughing

I absolutely agree with the concept of a monument as something that tells us not to forget what has been, since too often we do not take into account the importance of the lessons we could draw from what has already happened.

Instead we fall back.

Life, one would say, is made up of relapses and even death must be a kind of relapse.
Samuel Beckett

Of course we could work on how to get to this “final relapse” … or not?

Yet we persevere in being naively seized by the drifts that drag us too easily into the undertow of the historical ebbs, which rather resemble refluxes, which evil regurgitates after having eaten with impunity.

I quote again: the Weimar Republic remains there as a gigantic warning to “how it was” and to “how it is good that it never again is:” studying it is like seeing ourselves in the mirror, today that democracy is in such danger precisely due to new famines and new racisms.

So why don’t we want to look honestly in the mirror?

If nothing else, at least the unconscious could register what we don’t want to see, even Profondo Rosso teaches us this.

 

Can it then be said that we consciously refuse to see or unconsciously shun the evidence before our eyes?

Now I digress again, I know, but bouncing from mirror to mirror I came across a research by Professor Giovanni Battista Caputo from University of Urbino,  renamed as Caputo effect, do you already know it?

It is based on visual illusion: the professor recorded the reactions of a sample of fifty people who were asked to observe their own image reflected in the mirror for ten consecutive minutes.

The mirror was placed inside a room illuminated only by the light of a lamp positioned so that its light remained behind the observer’s field of vision and could not be reflected.

The results demonstrated distorted views and in particular: most testified that they saw distortions on their face.

Some people have seen the face of a parent, in some cases deceased.

Other unknown faces, animals or even monstrous beings.

Do you think we could try too?

I mostly considered the idea as a metaphor.

In your opinion, what role does the lamp play?

How can we better enlighten to see in the mirror?

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