INTERNATIONAL COFFEE DAY

INTERNATIONAL COFFEE DAY

Every year on October 1st, the international day is intended to celebrate coffee and recognize the millions of people around the world: farmers, roasters, baristas, coffeehouse owners and more, who work hard to create and serve the drink we love.

International Coffee Organization dedicates the focus of the 2020 edition to a collective mission to help coffee farmers around the world to receive a fair and viable income with the program Coffee’s next generation to specifically support the next generation of young producers.

Catarina explains it better:

In case you are interested, here is a small summary of some scheduled events:

Starbucks Reserve Roastery Milan offers a coffee tasting of the “Anniversary Blend” but pay attention to the specific time slots: from 9 a.m. to 9.30, from 11 a.m. to 11.30, from 2 p.m. to 2.30 and from 4 p.m. to 4.30, excluding the Malpensa Terminal 1 and Cordusio premises.

Talent Garden Calabiana organizes an outdoor community breakfast sponsored by Lavazza.

Cimbali  will host the first live broadcast of the Italian Coffee Network full of interviews, demonstrations and webinars in collaboration with the trainers of the Mumac Academy, organized by Istituto Espresso Italiano, SCA Italy and Consorzio di Tutela del Caffé Espresso

On the other hand, at Caffé Gambrinus, the From the bean to the cup event has unfortunately been canceled.
Just as on the Milano Caffè website nothing appears.
And it is a real shame because never before would it be appropriate to encourage the cafes that have been particularly affected.

For this reason I find the initiative of La Genovese Caffé nice: Offer a coffee to your bartender which proposes to overturn the roles leaving for once a suspended coffee for the one who prepares it, in order to express closeness and sympathy.

Or more simply as indicated here
On October 1st, World Coffee Day, users are invited to take a photo or screenshot of their coffee date and post it and tag @juliusmeinlofficial to support a global cause.
For each contribution that uses the @juliusmeinlofficial tag during the campaign period, be it a comment, post or story, Julius Meinl will contribute € 1 (or the equivalent in USD) in support of Worldreader up to a total of 11,534 $ (Eleven Thousand Five One hundred and thirty-four US dollars).

Another BEAUTIFUL THING is: Meet with a poem!

Among other things, speaking of poems, I could tag important friends.

The explanation of the initiative appears on the website: Julius Meinl who is the organizer and foresees a poem to be written together with a dear friend to receive two special coffees in exchange.

But ours are always special coffees, right !?

WAKE UP AND SMELL THE COFFEE

WAKE UP AND SMELL THE COFFEE

No need to argue: everyone knows ZOMBIE of The Cranberries.

I can’t simply call it a song, to me it’s history.
It has recently exceeded one billion views on YouTube and I admit that some are mine.
A deserved success, which closes the circle of the previous song of the year proclamation at the 1995 MTV Awards.
Zombie was shot by Samuel Bayer, who also made the video of “Smells like teen Spirit” to be clear, but more than the undoubted quality, I would linger on the message and on the voice of Dolores O’Riordan.
Unfortunately now the first thing that is mentioned everywhere about her is the circumstance of death, but I would like to talk about life.
Not of her biography in detail, but I would particularly underline how she wrote this piece in a flash, after learning of the tragic death of two kids from a bomb.
Although the episode took place in Ireland in 1993, a specific sadly known context, Dolores has always avoided politicizing.
“In your head, in your head” Dolores repeats it, she invokes, she invites to think, it would seem banal and yet too often it is not.
Hers is a cry to unite, to awaken.
“Violence causes silence.”
I find that Dolores knows how to make this silence speak, she knows how to give voice to pain, she knows how to shout not anger, but the strength to say enough.
Zombie is against violence, against the inability to stop violence.
This song’s our cry against man’s inhumanity to man; and man’s inhumanity to child.”
Dolores O’Riordan

I don’t know about you but as far as I’m concerned, the thought comes loud and clear and settles viscerally.
Her “another mother’s breaking heart” becomes mine.
Her voice, her unique way of singing, constitute the focal point: a catalyst, which allows the message to communicate all its disruptive despair.
Zombie was inspired by a child’s death. His life was taken in the arm’s of his mother. She was shopping in London last year, and there was a bomb planted in a rubbish bin in London and he happened to be at the wrong place at the wrong time and he died. The reason the bomb was planted was because of a political territorial kind of thing that goes on in the North of Ireland and the UK. So the references to 1916 was when a contract was signed, which signed away the 6 counties to England. And it still goes on today: the war, the deaths, and the injustice.”
Dolores O’Riodan

Zombies who see and feel pain, yet do nothing.
Zombies not from horror movies and yet terribly scarier: us.

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