IN LOMELLINA FIELDS

IN LOMELLINA FIELDS

Poppies are nice, they are simple, they are spontaneous, they are impressionists laughing they are light, they are cheerful, they are summer, they are color, they are warmth.

But they also become sad, when they represent the symbol that John Mc Crae chose to remember the victims of war.

At the beginning of the First World War, John McCrae was asked to join 1st Brigade, Canadian Field Artillery as the Medical Officer. In May 1915 during the heaviest fighting of Second Battle of Ypres, McCrae and his dressing station were within site of the Essex Field cemetery. After 17 exhausting days and the death of a comrade, Lieutenant Alexis Helmer, her wrote his immortal poem “In Flanders Fields.”

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie,
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.

If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

Here recited by Leonard Cohen

 

This made me think of Lomellina, its poppies and its victims of a silent massacre, which is not even a war, because basically nobody or almost no one cares.

I have already spoken of silent deaths, of herbicides, of glyphosate, of PM 2.5 and of liveability that are open wounds for me.

So we should not be surprised if once in a while some newspaper launches a news that is a little more taken up, but which in the meantime has already been forgotten in favor of other arguments, including aliens.

And we should not be surprised if an interception only confirms what we already know, that is, that unscrupulous people do not care in the least about the damage caused by the poisons that spill into our territories in the form of “sludge” in order to earn, indeed, they joke about it. .

It is not true that “hurting the environment and the territory is equivalent to not having hurt any physical person.”

Many people will get sick and will have to fight with all their might.

CHOP SUEY!

CHOP SUEY!

Chop Suey! It was voted best metal song of the 21st century, first of 100 songs selected and voted by Metal Hammer and obviously I can only be happy.

And to think that as usual “with the last train” I found myself listening to System Of A Down a bit by chance: during one of my researches that start very far and then follow absurd paths, but soooo profitable in this case!

In case you haven’t done so yet, I recommend you check out their site and to listen to their appeal for the people of Artsakh through the Armenia Fund to help displaced civilians, young and old, affected by the horrific war crimes inflicted on Artsakh by Azerbaijan and Turkey.

It is for our ancestors, our culture and our nation” Serj Tankian, Daron Malakian, Shavo Odadjian and John Dolmayan are strongly linked to their Armenian origins and in November they released two songs to keep attention on the acts of war in the Nagorno Karabakh carried out in September 2020, frankly ignored by the mass media engaged in their monothematic communications …

The name of the group itself comes from a poem by Daron:
Victims of a down
As the century nears its formidable end, our global experience of universal proportions, predicted by many greats, will arrive at our solar system, to our system of a down.

Their music in general is absolutely recognizable for the influences that represent an enrichment and give the feeling of a very special journey.

You understand it immediately by listening to Aerials: it is impossible not to be captured by it, even if my absolute favorite is Toxicity which at first listen immediately became part of the songs I love.

But back to Chop Suey!
The name of a Chinese dish chosen because it represents the idea of cutting: to chop and because suey resonates with what was the original title: Suicide.

The text, very intense, also contains verses from the Gospel as a symbol of a sort of request for help that connotes the human side, and was considered as a protest for how the media treated the death of Kurt Cobain

Serj stated «The song is about how when people die, they will be regarded differently depending on the way they pass. Like, if I were to die from a drug overdose, everyone would say I deserved it because I abused drugs, hence the line ‘Angels deserve to die’.»

But Serj also said “it’s quite interesting how involved coffee is in a lot of people’s lives …”  laughing
here he is preparing Armenian coffee… and what cups!

WAKE UP AND SMELL THE COFFEE

WAKE UP AND SMELL THE COFFEE

No need to argue: everyone knows ZOMBIE of The Cranberries.

I can’t simply call it a song, to me it’s history.
It has recently exceeded one billion views on YouTube and I admit that some are mine.
A deserved success, which closes the circle of the previous song of the year proclamation at the 1995 MTV Awards.
Zombie was shot by Samuel Bayer, who also made the video of “Smells like teen Spirit” to be clear, but more than the undoubted quality, I would linger on the message and on the voice of Dolores O’Riordan.
Unfortunately now the first thing that is mentioned everywhere about her is the circumstance of death, but I would like to talk about life.
Not of her biography in detail, but I would particularly underline how she wrote this piece in a flash, after learning of the tragic death of two kids from a bomb.
Although the episode took place in Ireland in 1993, a specific sadly known context, Dolores has always avoided politicizing.
“In your head, in your head” Dolores repeats it, she invokes, she invites to think, it would seem banal and yet too often it is not.
Hers is a cry to unite, to awaken.
“Violence causes silence.”
I find that Dolores knows how to make this silence speak, she knows how to give voice to pain, she knows how to shout not anger, but the strength to say enough.
Zombie is against violence, against the inability to stop violence.
This song’s our cry against man’s inhumanity to man; and man’s inhumanity to child.”
Dolores O’Riordan

I don’t know about you but as far as I’m concerned, the thought comes loud and clear and settles viscerally.
Her “another mother’s breaking heart” becomes mine.
Her voice, her unique way of singing, constitute the focal point: a catalyst, which allows the message to communicate all its disruptive despair.
Zombie was inspired by a child’s death. His life was taken in the arm’s of his mother. She was shopping in London last year, and there was a bomb planted in a rubbish bin in London and he happened to be at the wrong place at the wrong time and he died. The reason the bomb was planted was because of a political territorial kind of thing that goes on in the North of Ireland and the UK. So the references to 1916 was when a contract was signed, which signed away the 6 counties to England. And it still goes on today: the war, the deaths, and the injustice.”
Dolores O’Riodan

Zombies who see and feel pain, yet do nothing.
Zombies not from horror movies and yet terribly scarier: us.

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