THE BOOKBINDER OF LOST STORIES

THE BOOKBINDER OF LOST STORIES

The Bookbinder of Lost Stories is the book I read, again thanks to Monica.

 

Speaking of friendship, Sas Bellas Mariposas  and Mamaglia are skilled fan of the author: Cristina Caboni, so maybe they would like to tell us something about her.

In the meantime I would like to chat more about how I especially liked the parts that describe the binding process in the early 19th century.

Nowadays how long does it take to create a book?
There are several 24-hour delivery options on the web.

And each time we find ourselves with the usual question: have we gained or lost?

Recently with my husband we have been looking for someone who was still in a profession related to the traditions of the past, but here in the area unfortunately we do not have old style jobs anymore.

It is very sad to be aware that the precious chain of passing on knowledge and teaching patience and time needed to acquire skills has been interrupted.

By interrupting the oral tradition, we will deprive ourselves of the privilege of being able to know stories because there will be no one left to tell them.

So I would very much like to take up the concept of “binding” lost stories to unite them and to keep them living with us.

I spent a lot of time listening to one of my grandmothers telling about her childhood in a peasant family, talking to me about a seemingly distant era, about an essential lifestyle, about objects that we will never use.

My other grandmother, had less life to live but equally her tales remain indelible to me, as well as the memory her rice-fields worker  knees.

My great-grandfather, on the other hand, was a carter, and his traveling for work gave him the opportunity to meet and to marry my great-grandmother: German, in spite of the saying “wife and oxen in your own country …” jokes aside, theirs was a rather unconventional marriage considering historical period and social conditions.

But tell me please! I would love to “listen to you.”

If you have a craft to tell, if you want a story not to be lost, if you wish to pass on a tale, a thought, a concept, a proverb, an experience or even just a comment, I will be grateful and add it to the lost stories to be bound.

RETURN TO TIFFANY

RETURN TO TIFFANY

Return to Tiffany is Maison Tiffany’s iconic collection.

Its origins date back to 1966, when Tiffany first began selling key chains with the now famous phrase “Please Return to Tiffany & Co. New York.”

The key chains were assigned a unique registration number, which ensured that Tiffany & Co could trace the keys back to the owner if they were lost.

That’s why Return to Tiffany: because the prestigious Fifth Avenue store would be able to reunite the data through a precise and confidential serial number.

In the fifty years that have passed, the Return to Tiffany collection has made its mark as a symbol of the tradition of craftsmanship, a fundamental pillar of Tiffany.

A Tiffany advertisement showed the perfect gift for Valentine’s Day: a heart-shaped Return to Tiffany tag in 14-karat yellow gold, priced at $11 …

Over time, there have been several evolutions: in 1980, Tiffany debuted the first piece of jewelry incorporating the Return to Tiffany tag, a heart-shaped yellow gold pendant on a necklace.

The collection expanded to an assortment of rings, bracelets and earrings, each with its own personality, all engraved with the emblem reminiscent of Tiffany‘s unparalleled style.

Have you ever happened to lose something?

I’d like you to tell me that you found it or that it was returned to you by some good soul.

According to Article 928 of the Civil Code  the delivery of the object found must be made known by publication for two successive Sundays and must remain posted for three days each time.

These seem like archaic concepts now that all kinds of information is disseminated online.

In Japan have a special name for lost or forgotten items: WASUREMONO 忘れ物.

Don’t you find it cute?

For them then, return is a very important issue; they are extremely precise and accurate.

The most commonly forgotten items are:

. cell phone

. bag 

. train, bus, metro pass

. wallet

. umbrella

. keys

. electronic cigarette

Keys therefore come long after an object that did not exist in 1966: the cell phone, yet Tiffany’s continues to represent somewhat “the heart of New York.” Or not?

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