THEY DON’T WANT THE TRUTH

THEY DON’T WANT THE TRUTH

“They pass the years hoping that when my time comes there will no longer be anyone who will continue to insist on asking for truth and justice …”
These are the words, as hard as absolutely lawful, by Luciana Riccardi, spoken in an interview in March 2017 on the occasion of the twenty-third anniversary of the death of her daughter: Ilaria Alpi.
Just over a year later, in June 2018, the hour that Mrs. Luciana was waiting for has arrived, but her voice continues to speak.
Speak through all those who still believe in justice, and speak through all those who recognize admiration and respect for her:
In the meantime, the words her sister Annamaria Riccardi wrote in a letter before the archiving hearing ended in October 2019 were heard: the magistrate granted another six months of investigations to try to get to the truth. This 180-day deadline expired in April but for now it remains frozen like everything else.
In reality, the truth has been blocked for much longer, a very long time.
Who helped Jelle do what he did?
Who paid for it?
Why did they do it?
These are the three questions that Mrs. Luciana left us in her interview with Chiara Cazzaniga for Chi l’ha visto.
Chiara Cazzaniga in particular, has a fundamental role in the investigation: with unstoppable stubbornness convinces Ali Rage Amhed, known as Jelle, to come to Italy to testify for the innocence of Hashi Omar Hassan, in prison with a 26-year sentence. Federica Sciarelli, having a series of doubts about his testimony, instructs her to try to track him down.
In fact, Chiara finds him in Birmingham where he lives, where he has a family, and where he drives the buses, despite being officially unavailable for the power of attorney.
But who exactly are Jelle and Hashi?
Both Somalis, are united by the desire to escape from Somalia, and by the fact that on March 20, 1994 neither of them is on the place where Rai Tg3 correspondents Ilaria Alpi and Miran Hrovatin are murdered.
Yet in January 1998 Hashi, in Rome to testify against alleged violence by the Italian military in Somalia, was arrested for competition in the double murder, accused by Jelle.
Jelle alleges, as a justification for his lie, he did it in order to be able to expatriate: he is in fact granted a pass and a job with a mechanic who repairs the cars of the Ministry of the Interior. And he will declare to have escaped after being deposed at Digos, just trusting that it would not have been possible to convict Hashi in court if he had not presented himself: “look I did not do so much for the money … I took very few, because in any case I didn’t finish the job … but I had achieved my goal which was to go away from Somalia … and I didn’t think that if I had not presented to trial, an innocent would have ended up in prison, and above all I thought someone would have verified what I told “.
This is what would be expected from justice.
In fact, however, things went differently.
Three million euros are the amount recognized as compensation for the 17 years spent in prison by an innocent man, one would wonder if this is the price of a sidetrack.
No, unfortunately the price is much higher, the events are much more intricate and crammed with inconsistencies for which Giorgio and Luciana Alpi continued to demand explanations, invoking a truth that has not yet arrived.
A truth that was written on Ilaria’s notebook, disappeared, a truth probably buried under the Garoe-Bosaso road, a toxic truth.

https://archivioalpihrovatin.camera.it/

Justice, non-violence, human rights, these issues of investigative news reports taken into consideration for the award of the Ilaria Alpi prize.
Authoritative guests at the 2007 edition: Zoe Eroshok journalist from Novaja Gazeta and Ilya Politkovsky son of the Russian journalist murdered in Moscow, Anna Politkovskaya to whom the event was dedicated.
Different stories but with a common denominator:
“The duty of [the] journalist [is] to write what this journalist sees in the reality. It’s only one duty.“

ANNA POLITKVOSKAJA

ANNA POLITKVOSKAJA

Pending coffee is a small gesture for the benefit of a stranger.
Here I thought I could extrapolate the idea by transforming it into a dedication.
The first suspended coffee is for Anna Politkvoskaja.
The reasons are many and in these days when we find ourselves reflecting on events, the lack of a certain type of Journalism with a capital J pulsates and is felt even more distinctly.
The first memory I have of her is related to the 2004 tragedy at the school in Ossetia: Beslan.
A name that has become synonymous with pure horror.
A lot has been said about the history of tea, but since we are talking about coffee, let’s go further. She was determined to go on the scene to try to negotiate, as she had already done with courage for the hostages of the Dubrovka theater. Subsequently, she remained alongside the relatives of the victims, advising them to go to the Strasbourg human rights court and making an important contribution in the fight for justice.
Anna was born in New York, yet she fought to report the violence of the Russian army in Chechnya, Dagestan and Ingushetia, writing more than two hundred articles for Novaja Gazeta without ever being intimidated by the death threats received. Threats that have proven to be well founded in circumstances that I find particularly terrible.
But she left us the example of what it means to write for a newspaper, of what it means to look for the truth, of what it means not to be manipulated.
And every time we don’t get to the bottom of things, every time we accept flows of clearly piloted information, every time we content ourselves with not asking questions, it is as if we too betrayed her.
She is not the only one, of course, but she has done a lot alone, as long as she has been able.
One of her phrases is emblematic: “The duty of [the] journalist [is] to write what this journalist sees in the reality. It’s only one duty.“
When we realize that this does not happen, let’s try to watch by ourselves.

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