THIS TIME WE ARE THE FIRST IN THE WORLD

THIS TIME WE ARE THE FIRST IN THE WORLD

Twice I have emphasized how the French had been more advanced in dealing with a giant like Amazon but this time we definitely come first, and since it is an important issue such as workers’ rights, I am particularly happy.

Well yes: it really seems that the strike scheduled for Monday 22 March is the first ever that will involve all sectors: logistics, transport and delivery, both as regards direct employees and temporary workers.

Overseas a trade union battle is taking place limited to the state of Alabama which has however received important endorsements: President Joe Biden, several members of Congress, including Senators Bernie Sanders and Marco Rubio, other unions such as the NFL Players Association, the MLB Players Association, and Black Lives Matter.

This is the direct testimony of Jennifer Bates: employed at the Bessemer warehouse.

Do you know someone who works at Amazon?
It would be interesting to hear a statement from those who are personally involved.

The various trade unions have communicated the reasons for the stop: workloads and rhythms, shift bargaining, reduction of driver hours, stabilization of fixed and interim times, compliance with health and safety regulations.

It goes without saying that we are all aware that behind our convenience of receiving the goods in click time there are people who make it possible at times and in times that are certainly not institutionally canonical.

As we know Jeff Bezos resigned in February with this letter: it’s about talented people, pride, minimum wages and livelihoods.

Undoubtedly, he must be credited with having built an empire, here are the points he has set as principles of leadership.

Intentional Darwinism, rank and yank and two out of three politics,  or anytime feedback tool are not mentioned despite a very famous New York Times survey brought up various unfortunate aspects.

So let’s wait to hear the Italian voices too.

WE ARE THE GRANDCHILDREN OF KEYNES

WE ARE THE GRANDCHILDREN OF KEYNES

In 1930 John Maynard Keynes, a member economist of the Bloomsbury Group wrote Economic prospects for our grandchildren.

In this essay, which many consider visionary, a future prediction is hypothesized, taking into account technological development.

Some passages are in my opinion very interesting:

We are being afflicted with a new disease of which some readers may not yet have heard the name, but of which they will hear a great deal in the years to come — namely, technological unemployment. This means unemployment due to our discovery of means of economising the use of labour outrunning the pace at which we can find new uses for labour.

And how we hear about it …

Let’s take cars for example: how many are produced in your opinion?
Now any model is equipped with technology.
How much have prices risen compared to an average salary?
I speak for the province: now there is a range of models that cost like a flat.

Indeed, to be honest, very often the price is not even mentioned anymore: car manufacturers advertise offers directly on the basis of a monthly fee.
It is no coincidence that long-term rental forms are proliferating on the market: Why Buy, Free2move Lease, Simply with you, are just some examples.

How do you consider this?

In many other cases, however, the products have less and less value.

Let’s continue with Keynes’s essay:
…But this is only a temporary phase of maladjustment. All this means in the long run that mankind is solving its economic problem.

I draw the conclusion that, assuming no important wars and no important increase in population, the economic problem may be solved, or be at least within sight of solution, within a hundred years.

We shall do more things for ourselves than is usual with the rich to-day, only too glad to have small duties and tasks and routines. But beyond this, we shall endeavour to spread the bread thin on the butter — to make what work there is still to be done to be as widely shared as possible. Three-hour shifts or a fifteen-hour week may put off the problem for a great while. For three hours a day is quite enough to satisfy the old Adam in most of us!

“Within a century,” Keyes predicted, to reach the 100-year deadline there are still 9, apparently few, even if we are experiencing on our skin how everything can change more quickly than we could imagine.

MAYBE MAKING CASTLES IN THE AIR IS NOT WRONG

MAYBE MAKING CASTLES IN THE AIR IS NOT WRONG

We have had evidence of how our custom can easily collapse like a house of cards.
Have you ever thought about it in these terms?
In a whisper the daily habits went from being routine in some cases even the subject of complaints, to being a precious certainty that we would like to have again.
In this, I believe we can say that we are united on a global level, although everyone has their own story, everyone walks their own path, and everyone has their own habits.
Habits that for some had perhaps become heavy bricks like habituation, for others instead modular and elusive as sand, or, just like in the tale of the three houses, built with cards.
Cards that say who we are as documents or badges, cards that frame us, allow us access, lead us, regulate us, finance us: cards, tickets, maps, contracts, banknotes.
Cards that represent our actions, our life.
Cards that we accumulate, cards that we keep in balance.
Or balances that keep us standing.
Technically to build a castle too new or perfect cards slip: there is need of “lived” ones.
Cards that have played, cards that have been held in the hands. Hands that must be firm.
Hands that can never shake, because balance cannot be held in hand.
And never before have we had concrete and disturbing proof of this.
The question is: what exactly do we learn from this demonstration?
Who or what really has power over so many “houses” and how could we let them fall in the sudden way we witnessed?
We now have fewer cards available to rebuild, and we will have to adopt different “customs”, which will not be chosen.
Or maybe we should take the opportunity to learn to question, to ask ourselves questions, to consider all the hypotheses, always.
In the Operette Morali Giacomo Leopardi asks:
“… why is any custom, even if corrupt and bad, difficult to discern from nature?”
The answer seems to be Erasmus of Rotterdam:
“There is no practice, however infamous, however atrocious, that does not impose itself, if it has the custom on its side.”
Custom as well as a constant way of proceeding, is also a source of law. The unwritten source for excellence, which consists of two elements: one of a material type, that is, the reiteration of a certain behavior by a community; the other, of a subjective type although objectively verifiable, is instead the widespread belief that that behavior is, not only morally or socially, but legally mandatory.
So we should consider rebuilding on some unusual bases and starting first of all from the awareness of what is the true important essence of our life.

REGRESSION AND DEFEAT

REGRESSION AND DEFEAT

In the most common sense regression means involution, decline.
Regression is the way situation is changing about employment, for instance.
We have destroyed workers’ rights and completely misrepresented the general sense, like if it would be a sort of race to the bottom, an increasingly rampant exploitation in the name of costs cut that only leads to further impoverishment.
Often we forget that the loss of dignity of the individual can only turn into the loss of dignity of everyone.
One of the many facets of the decay we are experiencing is mobbing, a sadly consolidated reality to the point of inducing some subjects to believe, for example, that it can be a tool for temper formation.
Treating in a deplorable way a kid, who is just trying to learn and do his best to complete the school internship, means being unworthy.
As well as it means as a minimum deserving that people, all people, as first thing decide to spend their money elsewhere.
The tools we have available will also be ineffective if taken individually, but we should always remember that the worst defeat is the self-inflicted every time we tell: “that’s how the world goes.”

 

 

 

SMART WORKING

SMART WORKING

In Italy smart working is regulated by a law backdated in 2017 as a way of executing the subordinate employment relationship characterized by the absence of time or space constraints and an organization by stages, cycles and objectives, established by agreement between employee and employer work; a modality that helps the worker to reconcile life and work times and, at the same time, encourage the growth of his productivity.
Workers are guaranteed equal treatment with their colleagues who perform the service in ordinary ways. Their protection is therefore envisaged in the event of accidents and occupational diseases, according to the procedures. And there is an equal pay.
In short, this is the theory.
But the practice? Corresponds?
I would like to know some direct opinions.
And as a topic of discussion I would put the question from the point of view of those who, in addition to work, also take care of children and housework, since I have the vision of a greater number of pins to keep in balance. Which goes back to the topic of organization.
More generally, without excluding other experiences and considering any type of work, how do you set yourself for the daily roadmap?
Does the day start with a good coffee?

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