FRESH WATER FOR FLOWERS Valérie Perrin

FRESH WATER FOR FLOWERS Valérie Perrin

Fresh water for flowers, almost a reminder.

Which has turned into a word of mouth extended to the point of conquering the ranking with advice from reader to reader. In fact, I read it thanks to Monica.

Only later I found the list of awards won: Prix Maison de la presse, the Prix Jules-Renard and the Prix des lecteurs du Livre de poche.

I opened it in the dark, not knowing what flowers to take care of, and I found that the cure was for myself.

The immediacy with which I thought how congenial could be the work that the narrator does, was as simple as when we finally realize something that had always been before our eyes but that until now we had never really looked at.

Wearing such a fitting idea of serenity, however, cannot be a foregone conclusion, as much as it is not certain that the starting point is comparable to lightness.

On the other hand, flowers are symbols of delicacy par excellence.
Flowers are beauty, but also fragility.
Flowers need light.
Flowers need heat.

I loved the backbone of this story, and perhaps for this reason, coming to the ramifications I felt a strong sense of annoyance. But that has done nothing but make it even more of a perfect metaphor.

If we think about it, changing the water is an action of renewal that aims, however, to perpetuate the same goal, and in fact in this book the changes have the characteristic of bringing back to the origin as in the most classic of closed circles, such as the seasons , which complete their cycle.

But flowers can also be born between concrete.

100 DAYS STILL CHRISTMAS

100 DAYS STILL CHRISTMAS

Tell me that you too are part of those who love and await Christmas with the same enthusiasm as children!

I admit that every Christmas the spirit is put to the test more and more harshly, but magic always finds a way to fulfill itself and give the spell, albeit in different forms.

I also like to live the wait, to think about when I will remove the decorations from the historical boxes that keep them, to free them and the most suggestive atmosphere of the year ever.

Do you make preparations in advance?
Today there are 100 days to Christmas that seem a lot but they are few and I found myself dreaming to think back to the best moments.

What does Christmas represent for you?
The tree, the lights, the gifts …
What kind of gifts do you prefer?

Obviously, for those who love reading, long moments in the bookshop between classics and novelties are on the horizon, immersed in the indecision between inviting covers and important advice.

For example, I always have lists of back issues and long annotations such as The Count of Monte Cristo.
But maybe you are among those who have already framed everything very clearly.

In any case will you allow me an additional idea?
It is a real “signal” mine: SegnaLì 

They are not just bookmarks.
They are not just notebooks.
They are the result of a thought dedicated to reading, they are the fruit of the love for books expressed in gestures taken care of down to the smallest detail by artisan hands that take care of the realization with carefully selected materials, and who carry out every single gesture with passion up to customized packaging, as a last courtesy before the delivery step.

I had a particularly special gift: Mariposas.
And from now on I will no longer be able to think of a butterfly without associating the thought with the creator and without trying to imagine Campidanoshire as Gabriella likes to define her land.

But did I already mention that there are 100 days to Christmas !?

IL SOGNO DELLA MACCHINA DA CUCIRE Bianca Pitzorno THE DREAM OF THE SEWING MACHINE Bompiani novel

IL SOGNO DELLA MACCHINA DA CUCIRE Bianca Pitzorno THE DREAM OF THE SEWING MACHINE Bompiani novel

If I think of the sewing machine, my grandmother’s one immediately comes to mind, and I see myself as a child observing the gestures, the big wheel I couldn’t stop touching, the pedal, the bobbin.

She made everything seem so easy, then, over time, I experienced that it is not at all, like a whole host of other things.

Even the protagonist of the book, whose name is never mentioned, perhaps to leave the reader the faculty of identifying themselves at a deeper level, as a child watches her grandmother, who is all her family, sew, and she teaches her, together with sewing, the life.

And the teachings of the grandmother, as well as the strong bond between them, will save her in various situations.

The only place mentioned in the book is Paris, all other places are indicated with only the initial. Paradoxically, instead of losing the references, I found a precise orientation, as if Paris represented a single fixed point while “it’s a small world”, precisely with the slightly negative meaning of the proverbial saying.

A world in which even dreams become a luxury that cannot be afforded.

And so the sewing machine becomes more precious than a jewel, transfiguring itself in the way to improve one’s condition more easily, more intensely, but always with commitment, with constancy, with one’s own strength, without discounts, working.

Once again I thank Monica for this reading: an embroidery of female figures that I admired.

Stories of Women of those we like, of those who stand out, of those who struggle not to be princesses.
Women who survive.
Women who teach.

And the negative figures, the ruthless women, consuming themselves in their wickedness do nothing but make those who deserve shine more.

 

COFFEE IN ENGLAND ALWAYS TASTES LIKE A CHEMISTRY EXPERIMENT Agatha Christie

COFFEE IN ENGLAND ALWAYS TASTES LIKE A CHEMISTRY EXPERIMENT Agatha Christie

An entire blog should be dedicated to the one who is the absolute Queen, just to express that minimum of admiration and esteem She deserves.

But to remain in our space-time measure of coffee in the meantime, I would start from the bottom: that is, from the trailer for the next Death on the Nile. Have you already seen it?

Needless to say, I am very curious, not to mention that as soon as I heard the first notes of Policy of Truth  a standing ovation was triggered.

Unfortunately I haven’t been to many concerts but Depeche Mode in Milan in the 80s was a big yes.

But let’s go back to Death on the Nile: we can consider this one as the third version after the film with Peter Ustinov in 1978 and Poirot on the Nile in 2004 with David Suchet.

I’d say Kenneth Branagh feels comfortable playing the detective born from the pen of Agatha Christie if he’s decided to replicate after Murder on the Orient Express.

Yet Hercule Poirot is a very particular character, apparently uncomfortable I would say, and in general I would never have associated him with Branagh even if I consider him very good. Maybe because I have always perceived him as very English and as a Shakespearean actor par excellence.

Moreover, in Murder on the Orient Express, in my opinion Kenneth Branagh’s proof became even more complicated with the presence of Johnny Depp: since he is possessed by the spirit of Jack Sparrow he has accustomed us to caricature roles such as Lone Ranger, Dark Shadows, not to mention Mortdecai, who, as far as I’m concerned, caused the question “why is Depp Ratchett and not Poirot?”

To tell the truth, however, Branagh’s mustache, for how exaggerated it may seem, is more faithful to the mustache described by Agatha Christie, isn’t it?

So, leaving aside interpretations that have not left their mark such as those of Albert Finney, Tony Randall, Austin Trevor and Alfred Molina, who is your favorite Poirot?

Peter Ustinov, David Suchet or Kenneth Branagh?

BOOKS FOR KIDS: OF MICE AND “MEN”?

BOOKS FOR KIDS: OF MICE AND “MEN”?

Summer is an ideal period for reading, or maybe not, but surely during the holidays you can devote more time to books, for me it was so many times.

An unforgettable holiday was the one in which my brother and I used to go through the stalls every evening to hunt for books that often only lasted the next day.

I chose Agatha Christie’s books while he preferred Stephen King’s ones: it is thanks to him that I read many of them, since when he finished they obviously passed on to me.

It’s a shame when the kids in the summer maybe read less spontaneously, for tasks that have been assigned as homeworks, but there is always the basic hope that “duty” can turn into pleasure thanks to a good book.

And what about children?

Do you remember what was your first book ever? Maybe you still keep it?

As I have already said, I have many memories about the books that I started observing in the home library, I remember for example “Gulliver’s travels” in a vintage edition already then.

The first book from the school library, on the other hand, was “The Paul street boys”.

Among the many books that crowd the memories, I would also mention less classic books: “Anni verdi scarpette rosa” Malipiero edition of 1975 which was the first book received as a gift from a friend, and “Junior Woodchucks Guidebook” publisher Mondadori 1973 because my readings have gone before from the comics: I can’t say how many Mickey Mouse I could have read over and over again.

Now the literary mouse is more sophisticated and imitates a well-known investigator with a whole universe of references to “mice and cheese names” which in my opinion are very valid and amusing, reaching up to the great classics such as the aforementioned Gulliver’s Travels but strictly in Geronimo Stilton’s version.

I also found a nice selection by Survive The Kidz  with an additional version of Mouse in this case struggling with cookies, it is a contemporary classic too: published for the first time in 1985, with the particularity of being a circular story.

So, to close the circle, what did you enjoyed to read?
Mice? Men? Of Mice and Men?

BEWITCHED?

BEWITCHED?

1947: a meaningful year for me, my mother’s birth year. She, who was used to buy 10 lire of old newspapers just to have something to read. She, who made me grow up in a house with a large library full of books of all kinds.
She, who simply loved to read.
Never any imposition, never any particular advice. It was all natural, I still remember the titles that struck me most as a child, then I still could not know the story, yet they were already in my mind, ready to be rediscovered at the right time.
And one day, just like her, I simply started reading too.

1947 is also the year of the first literary prize Strega which took its name from the liqueur produced in the Guido Alberti  family company who was a patron of it and who subsequently, after his marriage to the astrologer Lucia Alberti, began his acting career and was directed by directors such as Federico Fellini Francesco Rosi, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Eduardo De Filippo and Roman Polanski. A biography that in itself would seem like a novel.

In the long list of winners of the editions that have followed each other from year to year, respectable names appear and a few days ago I read a statistic published by Gabriella which showed an overwhelming male majority .

I sincerely have to recover several things from the past, but Monica opened a window on the present, also giving me a key to the book that won the 2020 edition: The hummingbird by Sandro veronesi published by La nave di Teseo.

I gladly approached it, without knowing the author, without knowing the previous success Chaos Calmo and without knowing the various dynamics that led to this second victory.

“You are a hummingbird because like the hummingbird you put all your energy into staying still.”

The quote on the back cover immediately offers the first food for thought: suddenly static is considered as an effort, and not as the absence of movement.

The movement of the book is constituted by the temporal jumps with which the author leads the narration according to a very symbolic thread, alternating exchanges of letters and digressions with stories of daily life poised between the apparent normality and a crescendo of paradoxical situations.

I found particularly curious how the rather unlikely events of the main character made me think of Forrest Gump, a sort of coincidence, since I had just written a post about it.

But following the idea of the hummingbird, and trying to fly backwards to review everything from a different perspective, I developed the idea of metaphors to reconfirm the only true certainty we have: life has surprises in store and often revolutionizes plans and certainties.

But for the truth we are not still, we resist, something very different.

I think I’m not the only one to have found a sort of cross with painful personal experiences, of course then everyone continues on their tracks, but the scars remain in common.

This book also gave me a reference to childhood in reading the descriptions of summer places: Toscana’s sea near Bolgheri, Marina di Bibbona, Punta Ala, having also spent my holidays exactly on that same coast, and I found myself facing the thought of how we used to take things for granted until this particular summer, and how we never thought they could vanish.

So “bewitched”? Strega means witch laughing

No, but happy as every time a reading inspires reflections.

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