IL SOGNO DELLA MACCHINA DA CUCIRE Bianca Pitzorno THE DREAM OF THE SEWING MACHINE Bompiani novel

IL SOGNO DELLA MACCHINA DA CUCIRE Bianca Pitzorno THE DREAM OF THE SEWING MACHINE Bompiani novel

If I think of the sewing machine, my grandmother’s one immediately comes to mind, and I see myself as a child observing the gestures, the big wheel I couldn’t stop touching, the pedal, the bobbin.

She made everything seem so easy, then, over time, I experienced that it is not at all, like a whole host of other things.

Even the protagonist of the book, whose name is never mentioned, perhaps to leave the reader the faculty of identifying themselves at a deeper level, as a child watches her grandmother, who is all her family, sew, and she teaches her, together with sewing, the life.

And the teachings of the grandmother, as well as the strong bond between them, will save her in various situations.

The only place mentioned in the book is Paris, all other places are indicated with only the initial. Paradoxically, instead of losing the references, I found a precise orientation, as if Paris represented a single fixed point while “it’s a small world”, precisely with the slightly negative meaning of the proverbial saying.

A world in which even dreams become a luxury that cannot be afforded.

And so the sewing machine becomes more precious than a jewel, transfiguring itself in the way to improve one’s condition more easily, more intensely, but always with commitment, with constancy, with one’s own strength, without discounts, working.

Once again I thank Monica for this reading: an embroidery of female figures that I admired.

Stories of Women of those we like, of those who stand out, of those who struggle not to be princesses.
Women who survive.
Women who teach.

And the negative figures, the ruthless women, consuming themselves in their wickedness do nothing but make those who deserve shine more.

 

VOLTAIRE REPORTEDLY DRANK 40 CUPS OF COFFEE A DAY

VOLTAIRE REPORTEDLY DRANK 40 CUPS OF COFFEE A DAY

And it seems that in response to those who contested the abuse he declared: “I drink 40 coffees a day to be well awake and think about how to keep tyrants and imbeciles at bay” then adding “yes, it is a remarkably slow poison. I have been drinking it every day for more than seventy years and, so far, I have never experienced its sad effects on my health …
Given the current trend … was he right?
Considering also the fact that his coffees were a kind of blend with chocolate … I miss a lot of them …

 

 

 

 

 

 

COFFEE IN ENGLAND ALWAYS TASTES LIKE A CHEMISTRY EXPERIMENT Agatha Christie

COFFEE IN ENGLAND ALWAYS TASTES LIKE A CHEMISTRY EXPERIMENT Agatha Christie

An entire blog should be dedicated to the one who is the absolute Queen, just to express that minimum of admiration and esteem She deserves.

But to remain in our space-time measure of coffee in the meantime, I would start from the bottom: that is, from the trailer for the next Death on the Nile. Have you already seen it?

Needless to say, I am very curious, not to mention that as soon as I heard the first notes of Policy of Truth  a standing ovation was triggered.

Unfortunately I haven’t been to many concerts but Depeche Mode in Milan in the 80s was a big yes.

But let’s go back to Death on the Nile: we can consider this one as the third version after the film with Peter Ustinov in 1978 and Poirot on the Nile in 2004 with David Suchet.

I’d say Kenneth Branagh feels comfortable playing the detective born from the pen of Agatha Christie if he’s decided to replicate after Murder on the Orient Express.

Yet Hercule Poirot is a very particular character, apparently uncomfortable I would say, and in general I would never have associated him with Branagh even if I consider him very good. Maybe because I have always perceived him as very English and as a Shakespearean actor par excellence.

Moreover, in Murder on the Orient Express, in my opinion Kenneth Branagh’s proof became even more complicated with the presence of Johnny Depp: since he is possessed by the spirit of Jack Sparrow he has accustomed us to caricature roles such as Lone Ranger, Dark Shadows, not to mention Mortdecai, who, as far as I’m concerned, caused the question “why is Depp Ratchett and not Poirot?”

To tell the truth, however, Branagh’s mustache, for how exaggerated it may seem, is more faithful to the mustache described by Agatha Christie, isn’t it?

So, leaving aside interpretations that have not left their mark such as those of Albert Finney, Tony Randall, Austin Trevor and Alfred Molina, who is your favorite Poirot?

Peter Ustinov, David Suchet or Kenneth Branagh?

AS THE DAY GOES ON, THE STARS FADE WITH ENVY AS THE CHARMS OF VENICE EMERGE FROM THE FOG Mieczysław Kozłowski

AS THE DAY GOES ON, THE STARS FADE WITH ENVY AS THE CHARMS OF VENICE EMERGE FROM THE FOG Mieczysław Kozłowski

The first time I saw Venice was through the eyes of a little girl on the boat from Cavallino-Treporti.
Impossible not to fall in love with it.

As an adult I was able to see it a few other times, in particular it was suggestive to stay beyond the sunset to wander through the streets and squares off the most common routes, letting oneself be bewitched by the magic of a nocturnal Venice that instead of sleeping awakens whirlwinds of emotions; as well as arriving at dawn, walking among the carts headed for the local market with a thread of autumnal fog.

You know when you are in the library and suddenly you have a book in your hands that you absolutely must buy? It happened to me with a somewhat unusual guide to Venice that over the years I have kept among the books to which I have grown most fond of, yet I still have the impression that I know nothing compared to its beauty.

I have also collected images that portray the famous cats of Venice in the bliss of this city to their measure.
This picture is a gift from Luciana and perfectly represents why Venice is a charm for me.

Lela instead tagged me in the photo that portrays the Caffé Florian in Piazza San Marco with high water in 1963.
And to think that the only time we were at the Florian we didn’t order a coffee … almost a sacrilege I would say.

Who knows if the opportunity to recover … do you already have the memory of your coffee in Venice?

Among other things, the most attentive did not miss the not very obvious sign posted at the entrance of Harry’s Bar: the reopening is scheduled for Friday 28 August.
Good news for those wishing to see Hemingway’s favorite coffee table and grasp its atmosphere.
We have done it.

But the list of things to see, to live, to savor, to breathe, is very long, indeed, probably there is not even a corner that can not convey emotions in Venice.

What do you think? Could you indicate your favorite place among the Venetian wonders?

THREE FILMS A DAY, THREE BOOKS A WEEK AND RECORDS OF GREAT MUSIC WOULD BE ENOUGH TO MAKE ME HAPPY TO THE DAY I DIE François Truffaut

THREE FILMS A DAY, THREE BOOKS A WEEK AND RECORDS OF GREAT MUSIC WOULD BE ENOUGH TO MAKE ME HAPPY TO THE DAY I DIE François Truffaut

Needless to say, this sentence would suit me perfectly, except for that small detail of not being able to live on income …

But what happens when films and books overlap?
I mean: in the case of movie transpositions, what do you think?
Generally disappointment, or not?

Of all the cases we can talk about, Doctor Sleep is perhaps the most curious.
The film attempts to mend a notable tear: an important difference of opinion that dates back to the 80s, when Stephen King attends the screening of The Shining and is indignant because the meaning of his novel has been betrayed. In fact, Stanley Kubrick with his management emphasizes some aspects that we have all come to know: the hotel, the madness.
The director has an optimistic view of ghosts “because it means surviving death” while he doesn’t believe in hell.

King obviously disagrees, as you can hear directly from his words and defines the film “a beautiful car with no engine.”

The writer cares about the psychological depth of the characters he has created and which is distorted: the film version in fact omits the tragicity with which Jack Torrance tries to resist his own demons, not to mention that Jack Nicholson is perfect in the crazy role par excellence, but viewers are already predisposed to see it as such.

In a word Stephen King finds The Shining cold and reiterates that the Overlook Hotel burns in the book.

Mike Flanagan, the director of Doctor Sleep is committed to the work of reconciliation by dedicating half of the film to a reconstruction rather faithful to the book, and at the same time setting the ending, although filled with quotes and Easter Eggs, so that the circle of shining somehow can be closed again.

For this reason the film ends differently than the book and resumes the epilogue of the novel The Shining. Flanagan makes the Overlook Hotel the meeting point of a sort of triangulation according to which, to an adult Daniel Torrance, in a certain sense happens what Stephen King had intended for his father Jack Torrance and which we have not seen in Kubrick’s version.

What do you think of the result?

Remaining on my basic level, I was very curious to see the character of Rose Cilindro, and if on the one hand I find the choice of Ewan Mac Gregor for the role of Daniel apt, I was very disappointed for the cut of the whole part of the great-grandmother by Abra: Concetta Abruzzi.

The elderly poet with the Italian given name and the absolutely American surname (Reynolds) sat with her sleeping great-granddaughter in her lap and watched the video her granddaughter’s husband had shot in the delivery room three weeks before. It began with a title card: ABRA ENTERS THE WORLD!

Of course beyond that, hers turns out to be a key role and since Mike Flanagan has stated that he finds the character of Abra Stone fantastic, I find Momma‘s omission even more incomprehensible.

Or maybe it’s the way to leave a door open: it seems that the director asked Stephen King if there is “more” about Abra… a bit of the same idea that gave birth to Doctor Sleep from Dan child in The Shining.

Other circles to close then?

Pin It on Pinterest