TASHIROJIMA: ISLAND OF CATS

TASHIROJIMA: ISLAND OF CATS

Tashirojima 田代島 is an enchanting island populated mainly by cats


Hidden among the waves of the Sea of Japan, Tashirojima emerges as an enchanted oasis where pussycats reign supreme.

Located in Miyagi Prefecture, this small island has become world famous as ‘The Island of Cats’, a place where feline inhabitants outnumber humans and where the presence of these creatures is honoured as an ancient tradition.

The history of Tashirojima is intertwined with the bond between the island and its cats. Over the centuries, local fishermen are said to have believed that the presence of cats brought good luck and prosperity to their boats and fishing.

Today, Tashirojima is a unique tourist destination, captivating visitors from all over the world with its picturesque landscape and feline population.

Wild cats roam freely around the island’s streets, interacting with tourists and providing moments of joy and entertainment.

The islanders have also built several ‘neko-jinja’ (cat shrines) in honour of their furry friends, where visitors can pay their respects and leave offerings such as toys or food for the cats.

In addition, there are also some tourist facilities on the island that welcome visitors eager to experience the unique atmosphere of this feline community.

For cat lovers, Tashirojima is a true paradise on earth.

Here they can stroll through the island’s picturesque coastal landscapes, interact with a diverse cat population and fully immerse themselves in the culture and tradition surrounding these fascinating animals.

In conclusion, Tashirojima is much more than just an island: it is a world apart, where the presence of cats is considered sacred and where daily life is permeated by the magic and affection of these adorable animals.

For anyone seeking an escape from the hustle and bustle of modern life and a unique encounter with Japanese nature and culture, Tashirojima is the perfect place to explore and discover.

Massimo

SPRING? WHITE SHIRT!

SPRING? WHITE SHIRT!

 

Spring? White shirt!

Don’t you think so?

I have a real soft spot for white shirts and I guess you could call me an “addict.”

My wardrobe houses a number of them that have grown over the years.

I always like the white shirt, in any version, be it classic or Sangallo.

I find the white shirt a crosswise garment, suitable in every season, but when spring arrives it becomes a passepartout for lightness of dress and thought.

From the most typical cut to versions made particular by a detail, the white shirt knows how to be a touch of elegance and simplicity.

How do you feel when you wear your white shirt?

Which model do you prefer?

Would you like to look back together at some outfits that have become unforgettable?

For example, I would say that the Mia Wallace version is the most iconic.

Uma Thurman dances perfectly at ease in the asymmetrically cut shirt: slouchy, long points at the front and cufflinks.

Miranda Priestly obviously top fashion, the criss-crossed version is always very refined.

Julia Roberts frames the image of beauty with a knotted shirt in Pretty Woman

Meg Ryan distractingly American in “French.”

Audrey Hepburn thoroughly glamorous in Breakfast at Tiffany’s.

Dolores O’Riordan deeply essential.

Vivienne Westwood extravagant and brilliant.

Hermione Granger magical collegiate and Debbie Harry rock schoolgirl.

Will you add more examples of famous looks yourself?

Harper’s Bazaar quotes Marylin Monroe and for 2024 chooses the Peserico proposal.

How about retro style instead?

Giorgio Armani always perfect, this is one of his creations shown at Fashion week

Vogue publishes a roundup from the fashion shows.

At this point it is only right to quote Franca Sozzani and her famous phrase:

All women aspire to be elegant and, without understanding the true meaning of this term, they buy, in a lifetime, tons of dresses, bags, shoes. Then a woman arrives at a dinner party wearing black dinner jacket trousers and a white silk shirt, a perfect classic, and you notice her.

It is no coincidence that Franca chose a white blouse for her first cover in 1988.

Which white shirt do you choose for this spring?

RESTORED VELARIUM

RESTORED VELARIUM

Restored velarium at at the Cagnoni Theatre in Vigevano:  a rare case of a velario preserved in its original location.

It is a work by the painter Giovan Battista Garberini entitled The Siege of Vigevano.

The restoration was financed thanks to a fundraiser organised by the Associazione Amici del Teatro Cagnoni  and the Fondazione Piacenza Vigevano.

Sipario alla ribalta, written by Edoardo Maffeo, Dino Rabai, Giovanni Borroni and Pier Luigi Muggiati and published by Ievve, is dedicated to this work.

Sipario alla ribalta was published with the contribution of ASM Energia, Amici di Palazzo Crespi, Soroptimist Lomellina and the patronage of the Municipality of Vigevano

On Saturday 9 March at the Teatro Cagnoni foyer, the authors held the book presentation as speakers.

 

Edoardo Maffeo edited the part of the book concerning a careful biography of the Vigevano painter Giovan Battista Garberini.

Dino Rabai recounted what Vigevano was like at the end of the 19th century through meticulous research based on historical archives, interweaving his talk with curious and interesting information and anecdotes.

Giovanni Borroni dealt with the historiography of the 19th century on a national and international level as a century of important changes.

His speech offered a series of reflections that I really recommend not to miss: he himself called it a short chronology of a long century actually a long chronology of a short century.

I also leave you with the question that Giovanni Borroni asked those present: what is the historiographical sense of dividing history into centuries?

Pier Luigi Muggiati reassembled the historical facts, providing a precise reconstruction beyond the legend that has been handed down over time and revealing a particularly relevant detail.

But let us take a step back and return to the Siege of Vigevano portrayed on the velarium: if you pause to look at the scene depicted, you will notice that women are portrayed in the centre.

They are the ones strenuously defending the breach from the invaders commanded by Francesco Sforza, led by the woman depicted as a heroine in shining armour with drawn sword.

We have always known this character as Camilla Rodolfi.

However, Camilla Rodolfi is not a real woman: the name Camilla was inspired by the character in the Aeneid, while the surname Rodolfi belonged to an important family from Vigevano.

A woman who undoubtedly deserves mention is Pinin Brambilla Barcilon famous for the restoration of the Cenacolo: she was also the restorer of the Garberini’s velari, the book includes her report kept at La Venaria Reale

Giovan Battista Garberini also painted a second curtain entitled La Festa sul Ticino

Did you know that the curtain or velarium is also called a ‘comodino’ that more or less means handy?

I HAVE SEEN HER

I HAVE SEEN HER

I saw her win it …

And “it” is the BB Global Force award presented by Billboard magazine during the BB Women in music ceremony. 

Global Force as an award given in recognition of a woman in the music industry who has made a significant contribution to the business and who, through her work and continued success, inspires generations of women to take on increasing responsibilities in the field.

The Women in music event celebrates women at the forefront of all fields of music from composers and songwriters to educators and all other music professions.

I saw her …

She needs no introduction: Annalisa, @nali is Global Force.

I did not follow her debut, and the first time I heard of her was in the measure of “good but second best.”

Until during a play organised by the middle school my son attends, a pupil struck me by singing about a blue cat

I then went to research and discovered that the song was by Annalisa.

Annalisa who for all these years has continued undaunted to be “good, but in second place”.

And yet there is not a person who does not know her ‘I saw her …’.

Despite having my radio perpetually on the frequency of Virgin, a radio that only plays rock music, without really knowing how or why, I have found the refrain of Mon amour in my head.

And ‘I saw her…’ has officially become part of my way of speaking: when I find myself describing something mixed, tangled, entangled.

Physics graduate Annalisa Scarrone, Nali, teaches us how to chase dreams and show the world the Global Force.

Did you see her win?

I dedicate this photo to Tony: ultimate Katy Perry connoisseur.

ALL TRUE

ALL TRUE

Tutto vero is the title of the book by Alessandro Depegi, whom I thank most sincerely.

I met the author as a blogger and I recommend to follow his Quarchedundepegi’s Blog, you will immediately find his way of telling stories very interesting. 

E-mail after e-mail I am learning so much from Alessandro and I find everything he writes absolutely valuable.

Through his real ‘oral tradition‘ he opens a window on a period of history that I personally have never had the opportunity to get to know in such depth and detail.

But among the peculiarities that make Alessandro Depegi’s expressive language totally unique are his passions, including philately.

A world that is unfortunately dying out, a world that is dear to me because it also fascinated my father.

Do you still use stamps? When was the last time you received or saw one?

I often tell you about my personal nostalgia for letters

Did you ever think you could travel by following the route of a stamp, or discovering the history of various issues?

Few people have such detailed philatelic knowledge as he does.

But even fewer people have Alessandro’s life experience: a man who was able to combine his scientific expertise with deep and intense human research.

All true, then, what he tells in his book, just as definitely important is everything on which the reader will find himself reflecting “with wonder” to quote his words, and “by chance … that chance that does not exist.”

I conclude with this quote, wishing along with Alessandro that many may be the “Awakened.”

“Everything is either true or untrue, true and untrue together and, likewise, neither untrue nor true. Such is the teaching of the Awakened Ones.”
Nagarjuna

Pin It on Pinterest