LETTERS TO THE PAST

LETTERS TO THE PAST

In a week it will be Christmas, but what Christmas will it be?

This thought carries the nostalgia of memories that flow as if in slow motion.

If I could write a letter to me from 1979 I would tell myself to be overjoyed because the coming years will be an explosion of life, colors, sounds, emotions.
And I would tell myself to learn The logical song well, because one day unfortunately the meaning will appear in all its clarity.

If I could write a letter to me in 1989, I would tell myself that that was the first of thirty-two years of work that I will like but that I have to follow the desire to study and expect more for myself.
And I would tell myself to fight so that, just like in Berlin, all the walls are torn down.

If I could write a letter to me from 1999 I would tell myself that this whole idea of the 2000s is just a big soap bubble and that the upcoming future is wearing a mask that hides the regress.
And I would tell myself that there’s a difference between knowing the path and walking the path

If I could write a letter to me from 2009 I would tell myself that the crisis is not about to end and to be prepared to experience the recession.
And I would tell myself that The Resistance  isn’t just the best rock album.

If I could write a letter to me in 2019, I would tell myself to live every single minute with the awareness of the enormous value of simple moments that, however trivial, will change.
And I would tell myself that things are about to happen that I would never have believed.

But the worst fires burn intangible realities.

WE ARE THE GRANDCHILDREN OF KEYNES

WE ARE THE GRANDCHILDREN OF KEYNES

In 1930 John Maynard Keynes, a member economist of the Bloomsbury Group wrote Economic prospects for our grandchildren.

In this essay, which many consider visionary, a future prediction is hypothesized, taking into account technological development.

Some passages are in my opinion very interesting:

We are being afflicted with a new disease of which some readers may not yet have heard the name, but of which they will hear a great deal in the years to come — namely, technological unemployment. This means unemployment due to our discovery of means of economising the use of labour outrunning the pace at which we can find new uses for labour.

And how we hear about it …

Let’s take cars for example: how many are produced in your opinion?
Now any model is equipped with technology.
How much have prices risen compared to an average salary?
I speak for the province: now there is a range of models that cost like a flat.

Indeed, to be honest, very often the price is not even mentioned anymore: car manufacturers advertise offers directly on the basis of a monthly fee.
It is no coincidence that long-term rental forms are proliferating on the market: Why Buy, Free2move Lease, Simply with you, are just some examples.

How do you consider this?

In many other cases, however, the products have less and less value.

Let’s continue with Keynes’s essay:
…But this is only a temporary phase of maladjustment. All this means in the long run that mankind is solving its economic problem.

I draw the conclusion that, assuming no important wars and no important increase in population, the economic problem may be solved, or be at least within sight of solution, within a hundred years.

We shall do more things for ourselves than is usual with the rich to-day, only too glad to have small duties and tasks and routines. But beyond this, we shall endeavour to spread the bread thin on the butter — to make what work there is still to be done to be as widely shared as possible. Three-hour shifts or a fifteen-hour week may put off the problem for a great while. For three hours a day is quite enough to satisfy the old Adam in most of us!

“Within a century,” Keyes predicted, to reach the 100-year deadline there are still 9, apparently few, even if we are experiencing on our skin how everything can change more quickly than we could imagine.

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