ANTI GASPILLAGE

ANTI GASPILLAGE

Regarding waste  in France has entered a law in force as part of the anti-waste and reuse plan.

More precisely: Loi Agec or Loi Anti Gaspillage et Economie Circulaire.

After the significant step in the matter of Copyright against Google, our cousins from beyond the Alps have a further primacy: prohibit the disposal, or the landfilling and incineration, of unsold non-fueling items.

According to an estimate, textile products are destroyed every year in France in an amount equivalent to the weight of the Eiffel Tower.

From January 1st, however, companies will have to donate or recycle their unsold products.

The provision currently affects products covered by the EPR regime, i.e. with producer responsibility, and will be extended to all other products no later than December 2023.

But what are the EPR products? 

It is an environmental policy that makes producers responsible for the entire life cycle of the products they place on the market, from their design to the end of their life cycle, including the collection and recycling of waste.

In reality this legislation also applies to Germany, why am I referring especially to France?

What do the fabrics I mentioned earlier make you think?

Exactly, a particular sector: fashion

We had already talked about Looop or jeans for rent, but what could be new solutions?

For example, the birth of platforms such as Heuritech which, using artificial intelligence advanced (AI) to translate real-world images shared on social media in meaningful insights, allows fashion brands to predict demand and trends more accurately.

Or ReValorem which instead takes care of disassembling the products to restore the materials where possible and counts Dior among its customers.

Or also Nona Source, created by LVMH, which uses the concept of Looop and through a startup like WeTurn offers exclusive patterns with new regenerated yarns.

Speaking of fabrics: I will never forget the Marché aux Tissus in Paris.
Have you ever been there?

REPAIR CAFÉ

REPAIR CAFÉ

Repair Café is a fantastic idea that was born in Amsterdam in 2009 by Martine Postma.

But what is a Repair Café?

It is not just a hangout.

It is not just volunteering.

Repair Cafè has a very important social function.

Repair Café is a free meeting place where you can repair objects of all kinds together.

Repair Café is an organization that provides tools and materials to help carry out repairs on clothes, furniture, appliances, bicycles, dishes, appliances, toys, and much more thanks to the availability of experienced volunteers, with repair skills in all types of fields.

The success in the Netherlands has spread over space and time, forming a worldwide movement with the express purpose of preserving the ability to repair in society and promoting the recovery of objects that can continue to function.

There are organizations in Belgium, Germany, France, the United Kingdom, the United States, India, Japan and many other countries around the world

In this video Martine, Ginko and Therese explain also giving numbers

Isn’t it wonderful that coffee machines are among the most sheltered objects?

There is also a Repair Café in Pavia founded in 2015 by Irishman Mike Kavanagh and Australian Michael Richards.

The team, which also takes care of teaching the knowledge needed to repair, has since grown and organizes repair events in collaboration with various local associations.

In this regard, I would like to point out the appointment on Saturday 26 February: Activators Breakfast

Are you for reuse
Can you fix broken objects?
Is there a particular object to which you have given or would you like to give new life?

What if I tell you 金継ぎor kintsugi?

HOW DO YOU USE COFFEE GROUNDS?

HOW DO YOU USE COFFEE GROUNDS?

Have you ever reused coffee grounds?

I sometimes add them to the earth of the pots.

Unfortunately they were less helpful against the ants, you say they were particularly naughty like all the insects who decide to move here?

Have you ever tried?

Or maybe you can read them? The first scene that comes to mind is in Joel Schumacher’s Dying Young, when Estelle played by Colleen Dewhurst sees a bad omen in Campbell Scott’s cup.

What do you say? Better to focus on other ways of using it.

For example, RENS from Helsinki, Finland had the best idea of using coffee grounds together with recycled plastic to make sneakers!

They named them coffee shoes, isn’t it great?

I quote verbatim: we transform post-industrial plastic and used coffee grounds into feature-rich products that are made to go the distance.

While waiting to go the distance, this is definitely a first step, don’t you agree?

UPCYCLING: CREATIVE RECYCLING

UPCYCLING: CREATIVE RECYCLING

Upcycling according to the Cambridge  dictionary: the activity of making new furniture, objects etc. out of old or used things or waste material.
This is not recycling, it’s upcycling.

A broad concept that includes many areas and various all-round products.
However, initially I would like to focus in particular on fashion: also to continue the discussion a little in the wake of the considerations on reuse that I was pleased to read in the comments on Looop.

Starting as always with King Giorgio and with his “I’m saying yes to recycling” it must be said that in this case we are dealing with recovered or recycled materials, while upcycling represents a next step, it is not “simple” recycling.

Many stylists are in fact creating clothes, capsules, or real collections, reusing vintage garments which, skilfully revisited, give life to new expressions of their art.

In this regard we can take a look at Upcycled by Miu Miu: an exclusive and special collection of recycled and reworked vintage pieces, built around unsigned period pieces dating back to the period between the thirties and the eighties, which includes 80 unique and numbered dresses.

Another example is Recicla by John Galliano for Maison Margiela term that derives from the fusion of recycle and replica: a series of limited edition garments included in the collection, which bear the characteristic white label on which, however, the origin and the period are now indicated.
I especially like Wicker bags.

After all, Martin Margiela can perhaps be defined as a precursor of the deconstruction that has always been his prerogative, and, quoting him, the association of ideas with Jean Paul Gaultier is immediate.

I have been following JPG with particular attention since he designed the costumes for Luc Besson’s The Fifth Element: Leeloo is iconic to me.
And I would say that his show… bordello laughing as he himself defined it, as well as absolutely spectacular, was an upcycling roundup of the 50 years of fashion he went through.

The grief is for his goodbye to his career, but I would say that more than a abandonment it is a great ending.
could also launch a contest: how many names and quotes can you count? As long as you can really list everything …

Since we are in France, the Renaissance project, supported among others by the Kéring group, is also worth mentioning. 

The founder and president is Philippe Guilet, who has worked with many stylists such as Jean Paul Gaultier, but also Thierry Mugler, Karl Lagerfeld and Donna Karan.

This project implies a true and proper upcycling couture, and, in addition to the reuse of the garments, it also provides for the reintegration of people excluded from work, according to the idea of offering them a new life too.

The garments are donated by individuals who become ambassadors and ambassadors of the brand.
Renaissance also bets on the outskirts of Paris precisely to integrate and provide opportunities.

What do you think about it? Have you ever reused or recovered some old outfit that came out of a trunk?

I confess that I fell in love with some dresses that my mom had kept in the wardrobe for years, and that I wore them on special occasions.
Above all I would remember a similar sleeveless black velvet sheath dress with a slightly trapezoidal cut and a semigloss thread of black trimmings around the round and very closed neckline.

I thought it could be fun, in view of this particular New Year’s Eve (although it is an anniversary that I do not celebrate) to reinvent a dress with something recovered in the house. What do you say?

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