TOHorror

TOHorror

The TOHorror Fantastic Film Fest will take place in Turin from the 19th to 24th of October, are you a lover of the genre?

Obviously I was captured by the logo with the profile of the cat next to the Mole Antonelliana, but the reason why I was interested is I 12 passi – The 12 steps …

I already told you about Black Ink podcasts, advising you to listen to her stories

Now Serena is among the finalists of the contest Il gatto nero – The black cat and I can only say CHAPEAU.

The official page opens with a quote from Edgar Allan Poe and therefore I would say that there is only the classic “nothing to tell about,” but it closes with something less universally known: Donald Barthelme The aim of literature … is the creation of a strange object covered with fur which breaks your heart.”

Donald Barthelme was also called “modern Dadaist” and in fact, here I am trying to focus on that strange hairy object of which he speaks, but hoping to have saved the heart.

But let’s go back to TOHorror, I don’t know if you follow this event but I would say that the occasion is tempting also in view of the period: All Saints or Halloween or Samhain or Nos Galan Gaeaf whatever you want, and I would say that the ideas are certainly interesting.

The TOHorror website tells us that the first edition of the film festival, dated 1999, had none other than Dario Argento as godfather,  but does not mention an event in my opinion epochal that instead I recommend you to see absolutely:

the director Tiziano Sossi explains that the original version is 76 minutes long, and therefore, researching I found this very precious translation of Fucinemute which represents an unmissable document!

Especially after the part of the interview we listened to, I would quote this passage from the interview, which particularly struck me:

I moved when I was 5 years old to Kentucky, in a boring and very small town in south of United Stated and everything that I learned about evil, everything that I know about I have learned in that little town, from people there“.

This in my opinion is true horror! Am I wrong?

Ok, let’s change range:

My parents gave me enormous gifts, my fahter gave me a movie camera but he gave me music, he was a music professor and he gave me the joy of music, I growth around it, listen to it was the soundtrack of my life.”

Wow. What to say? Don’t you get at least two / three thousand questions?

And you? Would you like to tell what the soundtrack of your life is like?

A MONUMENT TO REMEMBER

A MONUMENT TO REMEMBER

A monument to remember, or a monument that must be kept in mind every day is the final sentence of what I could never simply define “comment” that Nick from Matavitatau generously wrote about the Weimar Republic

In case you haven’t read it, I strongly advise you not to lose it: you can find it here

Among other things, he also restored confidence to Massimo since I had wandered a lot from his idea laughing

I absolutely agree with the concept of a monument as something that tells us not to forget what has been, since too often we do not take into account the importance of the lessons we could draw from what has already happened.

Instead we fall back.

Life, one would say, is made up of relapses and even death must be a kind of relapse.
Samuel Beckett

Of course we could work on how to get to this “final relapse” … or not?

Yet we persevere in being naively seized by the drifts that drag us too easily into the undertow of the historical ebbs, which rather resemble refluxes, which evil regurgitates after having eaten with impunity.

I quote again: the Weimar Republic remains there as a gigantic warning to “how it was” and to “how it is good that it never again is:” studying it is like seeing ourselves in the mirror, today that democracy is in such danger precisely due to new famines and new racisms.

So why don’t we want to look honestly in the mirror?

If nothing else, at least the unconscious could register what we don’t want to see, even Profondo Rosso teaches us this.

 

Can it then be said that we consciously refuse to see or unconsciously shun the evidence before our eyes?

Now I digress again, I know, but bouncing from mirror to mirror I came across a research by Professor Giovanni Battista Caputo from University of Urbino,  renamed as Caputo effect, do you already know it?

It is based on visual illusion: the professor recorded the reactions of a sample of fifty people who were asked to observe their own image reflected in the mirror for ten consecutive minutes.

The mirror was placed inside a room illuminated only by the light of a lamp positioned so that its light remained behind the observer’s field of vision and could not be reflected.

The results demonstrated distorted views and in particular: most testified that they saw distortions on their face.

Some people have seen the face of a parent, in some cases deceased.

Other unknown faces, animals or even monstrous beings.

Do you think we could try too?

I mostly considered the idea as a metaphor.

In your opinion, what role does the lamp play?

How can we better enlighten to see in the mirror?

ARTYCAPUCINES

ARTYCAPUCINES

What does Artycapucines mean?

Rue des Capucines is the location of the first Louis Vuitton store in Paris.

The maison in 2013 to celebrate this successful debut which dates back to 1854, launched the Capucines bag.

In a short time Capucines became an iconic model.

Arty Capucines is the fusion of classic and art: six international artists personalize the bag expressing their completely unique creative flair.

On the website you can find photos, details and information from the 2020 edition. 

The next limited edition of 200 bags will be released in October but many previews are also circulating on the social profiles of artists such as Donna Huanca who defines it as a surreal experience

Among others, I cannot fail to pay particular attention to one name: Paola Pivi

Do you already know her 2007 performance One Cup of Cappuccino Then I Go

A photographic print belonging to the ACACIA collection by Gemma De Angelis, donated to the Museo del Novecento in 2015.

In case you’re wondering… yes: it’s a real leopard.

I admit my abysmal ignorance in terms of art, so maybe it’s better if I ask for help … Art and Cult Blog maybe will want to enlighten me.

Meanwhile, I remain on the topic of bags … this artistic performance was the inspiration for the Arty Capucines version curated by Paola Pivi.

The decoration in the shape of cappuccino cups, which a particular varnish makes similar to porcelain, is inserted using the inlay technique, while for the foam the leather, much softer, is embellished with gold leaf applications. Finally, the leopard is made with an overprinted embroidery to give an additional sensory dimension similar to fur.

Paola Pivi advises us to look into the pockets …

what will there be in your opinion?

WEIMAR’S REPUBLIC

WEIMAR’S REPUBLIC

Massimo explained me the Weimar republic and wandering around the web looking for details about it, I came across this sentence:
no one really knows the history of the Weimar Republic, if not lovers of the history of art and design

Obviously I wondered in what sense, and why according to this concept the Weimar Republic is less precisely known with reference to the economy, which is generally the focus, as for example in this Rai Scuola video

Of that period I had already mentioned the Baroness but Dadaism remains perhaps more separated from the socio-political context, so the fulcrum of the creative movement manifests itself with the rise of the Bauhaus

So I searched for a first answer to Moma:
Bauhaus
The school of art and design founded in Germany by Walter Gropius in 1919, and shut down by the Nazis in 1933. The faculty brought together artists, architects, and designers, and developed an experimental pedagogy that focused on materials and functions rather than traditional art school methodologies. In its successive incarnations in Weimar, Dessau, and Berlin, it became the site of influential conversations about the role of modern art and design in society.

The names that resonate are Paul Klee or Vasily Kandinsky, but obviously I cannot but mention Marianne Brandt and her metal coffe set

There remains the question of the true essence of the Weimar Republic: does all this really prevail over the disastrous hyperinflation?

Maybe you are one of the aforementioned lovers of art history and design and you know how to explain me.

Passato e Presente describes the Weimar Republic like a parable, divided into three phases: and it is precisely the intermediate phase that sees the artistic flowering.

Weimar is a political, institutional, social and artistic laboratory, crossed by the tensions of modernity.

Let’s imagine observing all this while sitting at the Romanische Café  where the artists met and being able to analyze the Neue Sachlichkeit: that is the New objectivity but also the expressionism of cinema and the approach to realism through their eyes.

Crossed by the tensions of modernity.

During a conference in Florence on the occasion of the centenary, published by the Ministry of the Interior  The Weimar Constitution is defined as the first Charter that tries to respond to strong social tensions, and as a document of extraordinary modernity because it re-proposes the theme of the relationship between democratic legitimacy and the legality of limits to freedoms.

So, I assume: only artists have had the opportunity to fully express and experience freedom?

Yet the Weimar Constitution provided for example: universal suffrage, wages increased in real terms, pension and sickness benefit schemes, compulsory unemployment insurance, government subsidies for the construction of parks, schools and sports facilities, and a massive program of construction of public housing.

But from “suitcases full of dreams” we literally passed to suitcases full of banknotes to be able to buy basic necessities and metaphorically speaking not even AVUS: Automobil Verkehrs und Übungsstrecke that is the first highway in Europe has been able to “run” the freedom of a republic renamed “glass” for its fragility.

But glass is also transparency.
How the truth?

I quote Wislawa Szymborska:
He made himself a glass violin because he wanted to see the music.

What would you like to see?

I would like to read your reflections if you want to share them, meanwhile I dedicate to you You’re the cream in my coffee by Marlene Dietrich.

MEMORY OF WATER

MEMORY OF WATER

If vibration is energy, than resonance is the reverberation of energy, and resonance is thus capable of relaying energy.”

These words of Masaru Emoto contain the essence of his studies on the memory of water.

Did you already know this theory?
When Massimo told me about it, I was literally enchanted.

Music, as I have already written, for me is energy and constitutes an essential component.

Even water is a a very important element that in my case takes the form of the link with the sea.

But how do they combine?

Masaru Emoto undertook extensive research of water around the planet, not so much as a scientific researcher, but more from the perspective of an original thinker. At length, he realized that it was in the frozen crystal form, that water showed us its true nature.

How? By freezing water samples previously exposed to music of various kinds and subsequently observing the crystals.

It even sounds like a fairy tale right?
It strikes with all the delicacy of the Japanese universe and their attitude, which I sincerely envy.

Listening to this interview I have been impressed by some passages, for example when he declares: “I feel I have a lot in common with Don Quixote.”

Or when he speaks of Japanese spiritual tradition and HADO: literally the crest of the wave, which represents precisely the energetic vibration that is transformed into the memory of water.

Wonderful.

However, I must also say that personally, considering Japan and water, my thoughts cannot help but run on the dramatic situation in Fukushima  and the imminent running out of time left for the tanks.

Also for this reason, Dr. Emoto’s intent to dedicate himself to children, who do not have the negative imprinting of adults, is even more precious through his Peace Project.

How to blame him?

And it seems we can not be wrong even with regard to his studies on which a double-blind test was carried out to reconfirm.

What do you think about it?

On the emotional wave of this way of music materializing into crystals, I then found myself reflecting on another wonderful moment in which music impresses the memory: pregnancy.

In this regard, I would be SO happy if someone wanted to tell me their experience.

I have always made our son listen to music: before he was born and also after. On the type of music, perhaps I was not very orthodox …

In this regard, I found Dr. Alexandra Lamont‘s thesis: senior lecturer in music psychology at Keele University, according to which children can remember things from the uterus much longer than we thought.

The University of Leicester research study reported by NewScientist explains that:

Psychologist Alexandra Lamont found that year-old babies still recognised and had a preference for musical pieces that were played to them before being born. Previous studies have only shown babies being familiar with pre-birth experiences when they were a few days old.
Lamont had thought the children might develop a taste for the style of music played by their mothers, but this was not true. Instead, she was surprised to find that the babies could discriminate and remember individual songs.

By Alexandra Lamont I also found a World Café participatory discussion “coincidences? I do not think so …”

A part from jokes, what music would you like to crystallize in your memory?

ITALIAN YARDS IN TBILISI

ITALIAN YARDS IN TBILISI

Lela is teaching me a lot about her country and their traditions, topics almost unknown to me up to now.

A few days ago it happened that she tagged me in a very funny tweet that can only make you smile, but even then I learned something.

Did you know that the courtyards of old Tbilisi are known as Italian Yards?

Italian courtyards.
I find it simply fantastic!

So, now fascinated by this thing, I started looking for information.

The result was an exploration in the literal sense since obviously the institutional sites are written in the Georgian alphabet.
Which by the way is composed of three systems: Mrgvlovani, Nuskhuri and Mkhedruli and has very ancient origins.

 

Oriental languages, my always dream.

Lela, you know it, indeed sorry again for the question of the pending books, and always correct me if I’m wrong, but I have the hope of being able to slowly learn a minimum of these characters that I find harmonious, almost as if they were able to communicate to me a sort of melody together with the words.

It is no coincidence that the three writing systems of the Georgian alphabet have become UNESCO heritage.

But let’s go back to the courtyards!

First I would tell you to look at the photo of this tweet because it looks like a painting.

So far I honestly have not found an immediate resemblance to the courtyards we are used to seeing.

But I found a first explanation here:
people often name this type of courtyards ‘Italian’, but it were rather Persian caravanserais which influenced to Georgian tradition structure of houses. Unlike the both of them mostly square shaped and surrounded by solid stone arcades, the Georgian ones will impress you by unpredictable shapes, light and elegant wooden arcades richly decorated by carving with unique combination of Classicist and Oriental motifs; crazy combination of numerous superstructures, overhanging bridges connecting houses , spiral staircases, glazed loggias, patches of various materials used during renovations, picturesque bunches of pipes and wires, riot of greenery (thanks to the wet Georgian climate) the effect is breathtaking.

And I would say that we are all in agreement on the breathtaking effect.

Here there is a series of photos by Ksenia Vysotskaya to reconfirm of the intrinsic beauty that transmits life lived at first glance.

Having established that the splendor is undisputed, however, it remains to be discovered how the parallel with the Italian courtyards arises.

Ask any Tbilisi local, however, and they’ll tell you the city’s much-loved architectural treasures are its charming “Italian” courtyards. What makes them “Italian” has less to do with the architectural style than the relaxed way of life that flourishes between its wooden facades. “There is a lot talking, arguing, gossiping that happens here. Georgians are very emotional, just like Italians.”

So it’s not about aesthetics but about essence!
What unites us is the way of life, isn’t it wonderful?

And it reports exactly to Lela’s tweet.

By a curious coincidence these days commenting on “the consolation of the willow” by OREAROVESCIO I found myself remembering the courtyard of my childhood.

The speech then continued with the memory of Bianca also on her blog

So I’d like to continue with memories but also anecdotes of the present: how do you live or how do you see Italian courtyards?

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