WALKING ON THE VIA FRANCIGENA

WALKING ON THE VIA FRANCIGENA

As often happens, Monica tells me a good story, but this time it is not written in a book: the story of Cindy Nanette and Mina, and it is only at the beginning.

They left Pontarlier in France on September 10th and are planning to arrive in Rome for Christmas.

These days they are in Lomellina: today in particular in Mortara, after having made a stop yesterday in Robbio

I, who was a child, let’s say … a little earlier¬†laughing I immediately thought of Remi, Joli Coeur, Capi and Zerbino, but beyond the poetic image I find the message that embodies leaving now really important.

Since it was declared a Cultural Itinerary, the Via Francigena has taken on a further role in addition to the spiritual one and initiatives connections and contacts have multiplied, thanks also to the web network that offers valid background support.

What struck me, however, is the particular “historical moment”: while everyone closes, while more or less visible barriers arise, Cindy Chopard sets out, relying on the good heart of the people and hospitality.

The idea of reaching the goal for Christmas is not of secondary importance. Curious coincidence: I underlined the 100 days countdown  exactly one month ago.

But as the scenario changes from day to day, perhaps never as now we are all living in the uncertainty of what this Autumn, which is presenting its first colds, and the next Winter will have in store for us.

So everyone has before her/him a sort of journey made up of different steps, to be taken more or less metaphorically, during which we can perhaps follow some other stages of Cindy and her traveling companions.

LOOOP

LOOOP

The word gets longer with an extra O, while the continuous loop gets shorter.

Hennes & Mauritz AB: the popular Swedish clothing chain known as H&M introduces a machine for recycling used clothes directly in one of its shops open to the public, and more precisely in Stockholm.

In 2017 the Swedish government reformed the tax system so that people could get cheaper repairs on used items, and Swedish clothing giant H&M operates a recycling scheme where customers get a discount upon handing in old clothes.

Meanwhile, researchers are working on finding new clothing materials that are less damaging to the environment.

Returning to Looop, the technology was developed by HRITA: Hong Kong Research Institute of Textiles and Apparel and will be visible in Stockholm’s Drottninggatan Store on October 12.

For 150 Swedish kronor, that is just under 15 euros or just 100 (about 10 euros) for those who are enrolled in the loyalty program, it will be possible to directly witness the transformation of the old garment into a new garment.

The process is divided into 8 phases:

  1. cleaning
  2. shredding
  3. filtering
  4. carding
  5. drawing
  6. spinning
  7. twisting
  8. knitting

It does not involve the use of water or chemical dyes, however, it is necessary to add a yarn of “sustainable origin” to strengthen the fibers obtained from the old shredded dress.

What do you think about it?

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